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Posts Tagged ‘Jamaica

I got this from a news site from Jamaica. Its about coach Glen Mills and Bolt, the duo who created history in the Beijing Olympics. This post is actually before the Olympics 2008.

Usain Bolt and his coach Glen Mills have been on a near four-year journey, filled with revelations, growth and triumph. Bolt, a wunderkind from high school, and Mills, one the world’s best sprint coaches, created history on Saturday night in New York with a world record in the 100m. Through the guidance of Mills, Bolt discovered there was more talent in his 6′ 5″ frame than he had shown in his junior years, with his meteoric rise in the 100 metres.

“Usain and I embarked on a journey from autumn of 2004 and I remember when we met just after the Olympics in Athens and he approached me to take over his coaching,” Mills recalled yesterday, during a press conference at the Courtleigh Hotel in Kingston where Bolt received $1.8-million bonus cheque from his sponsors Digicel for breaking the world record.

“I must congratulate him on his choice (of coach),” he quipped, “though I’m yet to know how he recognised that I could be the person to guide him to such a level.” Before joining Mills, Bolt spent the previous year battling injuries and was an exceptional junior talent trying to make the transition to the senior level. Almost four years on, Bolt has a 200m World Championships silver medal, the national 200m record and the indomitable claim as the world’s fastest man to add to his 200m world junior record.

CREATE HISTORY

However, the process wasn’t as smooth as the 9.72 seconds he took to create history in New York on Saturday.

“Over the past three years we’ve had our differences and we’ve had our ups and downs,” Mills said. “But I can say for him he never lost sight of what the big picture is and although we differ in what is hard work, we are always able to get things done.” Bolt snatched the record from countryman Asafa Powell, who ran 9.74 last year, setting up the prospect of a mouth-watering clash when the world’s two fastest men meet.

“I got a call from Asafa and he said ‘You’ve made things rough on me now’,” Bolt joked.

With both men having achieved the world record, undoubtedly, there is an unrivalled hunger for an Olympic gold this summer in Beijing. “You’ve got to be Olympic champion or world champion to really count,” Bolt said. “I think the Olympics is the biggest thing and I just can’t wait for the Olympics to come.”

CLASSIC STORY

The story behind Bolt’s 100-metre foray is classic. At the beginning of last season, Mills and Bolt made a bet. After consistent pleas by his athlete to run a 100m, Mills agreed under one condition. “I told him if he broke the national 200 metres record, he can run a 100m,” Mills said. That was all the motivation he needed. At the 2007 National Championships in June, Bolt electrified the National Stadium with a 19.75 run, 0.11 second faster than Donald Quarrie’s 36-year-old record.

“After the race he didn’t even say thank you, he just said ‘when is the hundred’.”

So Bolt got his way and impressed with a 10.03 run in Rethimno, Greece. Even after that, the 100m was always the second option to his pet event, the 200m, but Bolt was insatiable.

Started with a plan

“We started out the year with the plan that he would be preparing to run the 200m at the Olympics and he has always had the passion to prove to me that he is a 100m runner,” Mills said. “So I said we could achieve both goals; since I wanted him to get faster because the people who are beating him are doing faster times in the 100 metres, and if we are going to match them we have to get as fast as they are.

“So we mapped out a programme to improve his speed in the first part of the season and then we would switch over to improving his 200m for the Olympics. “It has gone exceptionally well, to the point where he is the world record holder in the 100m and not the 200m.” The goal, however, is gold at the Olympics and while Mills admitted that Bolt would compete in the 100m and 200m at the National Championships, it’s not a guarantee he will compete in both events at the Olympics.

“We have to look at how the preparations go between now and August, but we are keeping our options, open and, as a result, we will double in the trials,” he said.

PHENOMENAL ACHIEVEMENTS

Due to the nature of professional sports today, phenomenal achievements, particularly those accomplished in short order such as Bolt’s world record, the honesty of the feat deserves to be questioned.

“We will test any time, any day, any part of the body,” Mills stated. “Usain doesn’t even like to take vitamins; we have to give them away.” Such is the phenomenon called Usain Bolt and the equally genius Glen Mills. The Bolt/Mills journey continues next Thursday when Bolt returns to the 200m in Ostrava, Czech Republic.

In August the road leads to Beijing, China, where they will go racing for gold.

Source: http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com

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Even the most pessimistic of sports fans could not help but be inspired by Usain Bolt at Beijing 2008. The rangy Jamaican sprinter powered his way to an electrifying double in both the 100m and 200m events as well as smashing both world records. In setting his time of 9.69 seconds in the 100m Bolt even seemed to ease off and eat up the final yards at a canter. The ridiculous margin of victory for the sprinter only accentuated just how far ahead of the rest of the world Usain Bolt is. However, before this victory stunned the world in Beijing, sprinting was enduring one of its darkest periods in Olympic history. The list of discredited champions is disconcertingly lengthy in a sport which should represent some of the most finely-tuned specimens on the planet. The most notable of which is undoubtedly Dwayne Chambers. A man who was for years a beacon of light for British sprinting and a genuine contender for Olympic champion has now joined the long list of banned athletes after failing a drugs test. Chambers suffered more anguish than most on the way to his eventual decline but at least his rise to the top of sprinting was well-documented. Although, I am as electrified with Bolts meteoric rise and the next person, no one seems to know where it came from. Bolt has travelled from mediocrity to superstardom frighteningly quickly and the inherent doubter in me cannot help but ask how?

Performance-enhancing drugs have long cast a shadow over modern-day sport, particularly sprinting and have obliterated the career of many a promising athlete. The temptation to be at the pinnacle of a sport is often irresistible and steroids provide an illicit highway to achieving such a position. With this in mind, it is challenging to see Usain Bolt’s meteoric rise as a result of graft, natural talent and a physique simply made for sprinting. There is no doubting the attractiveness of such a route to the summit but it just does not seem to happen today. Disgraced champion Justin Gatlin is a case in point. The young American powered his way to the 100m Olympic title in 2004 and then again at the World Championships in 2005 and was viewed as the future of sprinting. As someone who’s hard work, commitment and raw speed had resulted in fairytale success. Two years after his triumph in Athens, Gatlin was banned from athletics for 4 years for doping and the watching world lost faith in sprinting once and for all. Usain Bolt’s victory however, has threatened to start a sprinting renaissance with people around the globe enthralled by the precocious, self-confident speedster. If this new king of the track is genuine then a renaissance is indeed imminent and Bolt represents a role model for all young athletes. On the other hand, suspicion persists in any sudden sporting success and the worry persists that Bolt will follow the painful example of many a sprinting star.

Olympic legend Carl Lewis was the first high profile questioner of Bolt’s dramatic victory. Lewis commented: “To run 10.03 seconds one year and win the Olympic final with 9.69 the next, if you don’t question that in a sport with the reputation it has right now, then you’re a fool.” Although the remark has been widely condemned, by no less than Jamaican sprinting star Asafa Powell, it will undoubtedly mimic the views of many a sports fan. It is not small-minded pessimism but justifiable doubt, especially in a sport which has seen athlete after athlete in recent years crumble into insignificance. Jamaica has consistently boasted a clean record in terms of doping and one would be hard pushed to remember a scandal involving steroids and a Jamaican athlete. However, admirable as this record is, it is also true that Jamaica does not have an independent, out-of-competition testing program for its athletes, nor has it joined the Caribbean Regional Anti-Doping Organization. This has been the cause of murmurs of discontent among athletic bodies. Not because anyone holds the steadfast belief that Usain Bolt or any Jamaican champions are guilty of drug cheating but simply because if you do not test then how do you know for certain that a victory was pure. Thus although the overwhelming likelihood is that Usain Bolt’s astonishing double was unadulterated, the web of doubters, fuelled by years of Olympic scandal and expulsion, will never truly be silenced unless Jamaica do more to test their athletes at every level.

Conversely, there is the view held by euphoric sports fans around the globe that Usain Bolt is a true people’s champion. Someone who has emerged from years of training and taken the sprinting world by storm with his inimitable style and charismatic manner. The “Lightning Bolt” knew what he wanted to achieve and pushed himself to the limit of his physical powers in order to achieve it. He is the man who everyone now wants to be, the first poster up on a bedroom wall – Bolt crossing the finish line with his arms aloft and the rest of the field disappearing into the Beijing smog. This is an image that is rightfully held and should still be held years down the line. A true champion, immune from drugs scandals and moanings of suspicion. Usain Bolt the architect of a sprinting renaissance and an inspiration for every corner of the globe. Here’s to hoping that such a view remains forever in sporting history and that doubts are cleared. However, until that final proof arrives, those who still reluctantly hold nagging doubts can be forgiven and it is up to the powers that be and the man himself to assure us of his clean brilliance.

Source : Online news